5 future Terriers taken in 2014 NHL Draft

 By Conor Ryan/DFP Staff
It was another successful draft weekend for the Boston University men’s hockey team, as five future Terriers were selected in the 2014 NHL Draft.
BU and crosstown rival Boston College led all NCAA programs with five players taken in the draft apiece.
’96 forward Maxim Letunov was the first Terrier taken off the board, drafted in the second round (52nd overall) by the St. Louis Blues. Originally from Moscow, Letunov played for the Youngstown Phantoms of the United States Hockey League, finishing third on the team with 43 points (19 goals, 24 assists). Letunov will return to Youngstown for the 2014-15 season and is expected to join the Terriers the following year.
Another BU recruit was selected just five picks later, as soon-to-be freshman defenseman John MacLeod was taken in the second round (57th overall) by the Tampa Bay Lightning. A native of Dracut, Mass., MacLeod played in 52 games with the U.S. National Team Development Program U18 team last season, recording five goals and six assists for a total of 11 points.  MacLeod, who played alongside two other incoming BU freshmen — forward Jack Eichel and defenseman Brandon Fortunato — with the NTDP U18 squad, is expected to be a physical presence on the BU blueline next season.

I am so honored to be apart of the @TBLightning organization! Thank you to all friends and family that helped me get to this point!!
— johnny Macleod (@johnnyMacleod16) June 28, 2014

In the third round of the draft, incoming freshman defenseman Brandon Hickey was selected by the Calgary Flames (64th overall). Described by BU head coach David Quinn as a “fantastic skater” in a similar vein to captain and junior defenseman Matt Grzelcyk, Hickey played with the Spruce Grove Saints of the Alberta Junior Hockey League last season, contributing four goals and 18 assists (22 points) in 49 games. The Leduc, Alberta, native was the first AJHL player to be taken in the draft.

Could not be more excited to be apart of the @NHLFlames organization, it truly is an honour to be selected by them
— Brandon Hickey (@BHickey14) June 28, 2014

Another member of BU’s 2014-15 freshman class was taken in the fourth round, as forward J.J. Piccinich was taken with the 103rd pick by the Toronto Maple Leafs. The Paramus, N.J., product played for the Youngstown Phantoms last season alongside Letunov, finishing second on the team in scoring with 27 goals and 31 assists (58 points). The 5-foot-11 forward projects as a strong skater with great offensive instincts.

I can’t describe the feeling of being drafted by the @MapleLeafs organization. Thank you to all friends and family for making it possible!!!
— JJ Piccinich (@JJPiccinich) June 28, 2014

The final future Terrier chosen in the draft was 2014 forward Liam Coughlin, who was taken by the Edmonton Oilers in the fifth round (130th overall). A 6-foot-3 South Boston native, Coughlin recorded 51 points (27 goals, 24 assists) as a senior at Catholic Memorial in 2012-13 before totaling 45 points (18 goals, 27 assists) in 53 games with the Vernon Vipers of the British Columbia Hockey League last season.

Sixty-two current and future NCAA players were chosen during the two-day event, marking the 13th consecutive year in which more than 60 college hockey players were selected in the NHL Draft. Former NCAA players made up 31 percent of NHL rosters during the 2013-14 season, an all-time high.

Terriers add goaltender LaCouvee, ’98-born Bellows

By Andrew Battifarano/DFP Staff

This summer continues to be a productive one on the recruiting front for the Boston University men’s hockey team.

Forward Kieffer Bellows made his commitment with the Terriers official on Twitter Wednesday night, making him the third ’98 player to agree to attend BU. 

I am very excited and proud to announce my commitment to Boston University! Thank you to everybody who has helped me! #GoTerriers
— Kieffer Bellows (@BellowsKieffer) June 20, 2014

At Edina High School this season, Bellows notched 27 points in 25 games played. He also scored three times in five games during his team’s state title run.

Bellow’s 5-foot-11 stature has allowed him to develop into one of the top power forwards in the amateur ranks. In May, he was selected 14th overall by the Sioux Stampede in the USHL Phase I Futures Draft. The Minnesota native is the son of former NHL winger and Stanley Cup champion Brian Bellows.

It has not been confirmed what season Bellows will be joining the Terriers, but fellow ’98-born players — forwards Clayton Keller and Hank Crone — are set to be on Commonwealth Avenue for the 2016-17 campaign.

BU also added goaltender Connor LaCouvee to the mix. He joins junior netminders Matt O’Connor and Sean Maguire and graduate student Anthony Moccia.

LaCouvee played in 38 games for the Alberni Valley Bulldogs (Port Alberni, British Columbia) in 2013-14, posting a 2.82 goals-against average and a .920 save percentage. According to a report, LaCouvee will join the Terriers for the 2014-15 season.

Tilts against Union, Michigan, U.S. National Junior Team highlight Terriers’ 2014-15 schedule

By Conor Ryan/DFP Staff

David Quinn’s second go-around with the Boston University men’s hockey team looks to be a memorable, if not challenging, campaign.
The program released its 2014-15 schedule Thursday, revealing plenty of both new and familiar matchups for the Terriers.
Games against reigning NCAA champion Union College, University of Wisconsin, University of Michigan and both the U.S. National Junior Team and the U.S. National Under-18 Team highlight the schedule for the Terriers, who are looking to rebound from a disappointing 2013-14 year.
BU’s season will kick off on Oct. 4, as the Terriers will host St. Thomas University-New Brunswick before opening up regular-season play on the road against the University of Massachusetts-Amherst on Oct. 10.
The Terriers will then host the U.S. U-18 team on Oct. 18 before starting their home schedule the following weekend with games against Michigan State University and Michigan on Oct. 24 and 25, respectively.
Other notable non-conference games on the schedule include the first ever meeting between Union and BU at Agganis Arena on Jan. 3 and contests against Harvard University (Nov. 25), Colgate University (Nov. 29), Dartmouth College (Nov. 30) and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Dec. 13).
The Terriers will also travel to Madison for the first time since 2000 to take on Wisconsin in a two-game road tilt on Jan. 9-10. BU will also move back to its old confines of Walter Brown Arena on Dec. 19 to take on the U.S. National Junior Team.
Twenty-two Hockey East games are set for the upcoming season, including a home game against Boston College on Jan. 16. Two Hockey East teams will be making their first trips up to Agganis this season, as BU will host the University of Notre Dame for a weekend series on Feb. 20-21 and new conference member University of Connecticut on Nov. 16.
The Terriers will kick off the 63rd annual Beanpot on Feb. 2 and 9 at TD Garden. BU will take on Harvard in the first round before taking on either Boston College or Northeastern University the following weekend.
For the full schedule, check out the “2014-15 schedule” tab on the left.

From walk-on to Terrier legend: John Curry reflects on BU Hall of Fame induction

By Conor Ryan/DFP Staff

When he first entered Walter Brown Arena in the Fall of 2003, Boston University goaltender John Curry was a virtual unknown – a recruited walk-on who was resigned to playing Division-III hockey just a few months earlier.

Fast-forwarding to the present day, even Curry found it hard to believe that just 11 years after his arrival in Boston, he would be receiving an honorary red jacket from legendary head coach Jack Parker, as the netminder was elected to the Boston University Athletic Hall of Fame Saturday night.
“When I first found out, I was surprised,” Curry said. “It was nothing I ever expected. I really appreciate it, because I’ve actually gotten a chance to reflect heading up to this event and really think about my time here and all the people that helped me here. It’s just been a fun night and it just means more than I can describe.”
Curry, the seventh goalie to be named to the prestigious club, was elected in his first year of eligibility. While Curry left Commonwealth Avenue with the program’s all-time record in both goals-against average (2.07) and save percentage (.923), his road to BU hockey stardom was paved with both frustration and disappointment.
Growing up in the small town of Shorewood, Minn., Curry got his first taste of discouragement when his favorite team, the Minnesota North Stars, moved down to Dallas when he was just nine years old.
The young goaltender would soon turn his attention to the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers, where his dream of playing Division-I hockey was born.
After an impressive high-school career at the Breck School in Golden Valley, Minn., led to no real opportunities with D-I programs, Curry attended the Taft School in Watertown, Conn., for one season, compiling a 1.46 GAA and a .920 save percentage.
In the waning days of Taft’s season, Curry accepted the harsh reality that his goal of playing for a D-I hockey team was likely dead, and planned on signing with a D-III school in the coming weeks.
However, Curry’s luck would quickly turn around, as BU’s then-associate head coach Brian Durocher scouted the goaltender and offered him a spot on the team as a walk-on.
“I’m sure I would’ve had a great time [playing D-III hockey,], but what I wanted was to play Division-I hockey, so to get that call from  [Durocher] and to get the opportunity was one of the best moments of my life,” Curry said. “For things to go the way they did, and to have the teams we did, it was just a bonus. It was an amazing ride.”
Serving as the third-string goalie during the 2003-04 season, Curry only saw five minutes of ice time during his freshman campaign. With the departure of Sean Fields at the end of the season, the starting goaltender job was up for grabs.
Curry noted that while he obviously had his mind set on seizing the heralded position, his preparation did not change going into the new year. 
“Everything was still new for me. It was my second year, but you just take it day by day,” Curry said. “For me, I was just going in with the same mentality of just trying to be good in practice and be ready. I was fortunate enough to get an opportunity early in the year and the team played well in front of me and it went well for a while, which allowed me to gain some confidence and establish myself.
“A lot of stars had to align. I definitely worked hard for it but I had so much help along the way too.”
After getting a start early in the season, Curry would never relinquish his spot, protecting the crease for the next three seasons. By the time he played his final game for the Terriers, Curry had led his team to three Beanpot titles, the 2006 Hockey East Championship and was a top-10 finalist for the Hobey Baker Award during his senior year in 2007. 
Despite forging an incredible legacy at BU, Curry was not drafted by an NHL team – instead signing with the Pittsburgh Penguins as a free agent on July 1, 2007.
Assuming the role of undrafted free agent would aid Curry in his career, giving him a chip on his shoulder that he first gained while struggling to impress D-I schools during his high-school years.
“It’s helped me. I’ve found a little bit of an identity that way by just trying to prove myself,” Curry said. “I don’t feel like I’m cheated. It’s just one of those things where everyone’s competitive, they want to be recognized, they want to get those opportunities, and for me, it’s just easier to use that type of attitude to be aggressive.”
After four years with the Penguins organization, Curry played one season in Germany with the Hamburg Freezers of the Deutsche Eishockey Liga before returning to the United States to play for the Iowa Wild, the AHL affiliate of his hometown Minnesota Wild.
The BU Athletic Hall of Fame boasts an impressive class of former Terriers – including players and coaches such as Mike Eruzione, Jim Craig, Chris Drury and Jack Parker.
Joining them now is a former walk-on in Curry, who, after fighting for a chance his whole life, became a legend on the ice for the scarlet and white. 
“For me to be named to the BU Athletics Hall of Fame, believe me when I say that I could have never imagined this in my wildest dreams,” Curry said. “It’s the single greatest honor that I’ve ever received.”